Five Myths About Economic Growth

by Brian Czech Myth #1. It’s economic. To be economic, something has to be worth more than it costs. Economic activity, per se, is more beneficial than detrimental. Technically speaking, “marginal utility is greater than marginal disutility.” If you liked a rug, but liked your grandkids more, it wouldn’t be smart to grab the rug […]

Preempting a Misleading Argument: Why Environmental Problems Will Stop Tracking with GDP

Brian explains how GDP growth will eventually stop tracking with environmental damage–but the reasons may not be what you’d expect!

Who Moved Obama’s Win-Win Cheese?

by Brian Czech Whether or not you like President Obama or his policy preferences, you have to acknowledge his consistency. Even those with “zero regard” for the president confess, “At least Obama is consistent.” But not consistently. There is one issue, at least, on which he hasn’t held still, moving in and out like an […]

A Stick in the Stocking: Santa’s Supply Shock

A drop in fuel prices may seem great now, but what happens after the party is over?

Animal Welfare: Seeing the Forest for the Denizens

Has economic growth become the inconvenient truth for animal welfare?

Paul Krugman on Limits to Growth: Beware the Bathwater

Brian Czech responds to Paul Krugman’s shockingly weak column, which argues against the limits to growth with the example of slow steaming.

The Kingdom of God: A Steady State Economy?

Brian Czech discusses a theological basis for a steady state economy.

The Overlooked Anniversary: Forty Years Ago Congress and the President Called for a Steady State Economy

How should we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the ESA and the 100 year anniversary of the death of the last passenger pigeon?

Gross Domestic Problem: Don’t Shoot the Measurement

GDP growth is creating more problems than it solves–which is exactly why we need to keep calculating and monitoring it.

The One Percent: Not Kristallnacht but Lebensraum

The purchase of expensive luxury goods requires an agricultural and extractive surplus at the base of the economy–this is the “tropic theory of money.”