Spending on Preventing Climate Wars versus Spending to Secure Sources of Oil

To avoid a fate like the Mayans in Central America and the Polynesians on Easter Island, we will need to move toward a steady state economy–with the help of social scientists and natural scientists.

Three Limits to Growth

Our economy faces a futility limit, ecological catastrophe limit, and an economic limit. Fortunately, the economic limit will likely be the first we encounter; hopefully we can implement a steady state economy before the others are reached!

Transformative Common Sense in Vermont

Vermont moves to the forefront of a quiet revolution to integrate GPI into social and economic policy.

The Overlooked Anniversary: Forty Years Ago Congress and the President Called for a Steady State Economy

How should we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the ESA and the 100 year anniversary of the death of the last passenger pigeon?

Cold War Left Overs

Daly challenges the assertion that a steady-state economy is inherently capitalistic and must be instead be based on a socialist system.

Piketty Acknowledges a Limit to Inequality–Will He Acknowledge the Limits to Growth?

We are going to need more than a wealth tax to fix our economy.

Iraq and the Military-Industrial Complex versus a True Cost Economy

A switch to solar and other renewables will greatly reduce the resources devoted to waging war and help us achieve a steady state economy.

Fresh Water, Growth, Degrowth, and the Steady State Economy

by Geoffrey Matthews In Our Common Future, the 1987 report of the United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development, sustainable development is described as a process of change which meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs and aspirations. To achieve this objective, […]

Integrating Ecology and Economics

What is the best strategy for incorporating limits to growth into economics?

The One Percent: Not Kristallnacht but Lebensraum

The purchase of expensive luxury goods requires an agricultural and extractive surplus at the base of the economy–this is the “tropic theory of money.”